Thursday, April 7, 2011

Top 10 High Depression Careers

10. Salespeople
People who work in sales are No. 10 on the list, though there are a whole host of reasons why the job could contribute to depression.

Many salespeople work on commission, meaning you never know exactly when your next paycheck is coming. They may travel, and have to spend time away from home, family, and friends.

9. Financial Advisors and Accountants
“There is so much responsibility for other people’s finances and no control of the market. There is guilt involved, and when (clients) are losing money, they probably have people screaming at them with regularity.”

8. Maintenance and Ground Workers
They have to work odd hours, seasonal or varied schedules, and frequent night shifts. They are often paid little for a tough job that can include cleaning up other people’s messes.

7. Administrative Support Staff
They are on the front line, taking orders from all directions. But they are also at the bottom of the totem pole in terms of control and “everything filters down.”

6. Teachers
“There are pressures from many different audiences—the kids, their parents, and the schools trying to meet standards, all (of which) have different demands.”

5. Artists, Entertainers, and Writers
These jobs can bring irregular paychecks, uncertain hours, and isolation.

Creative people may also have higher rates of mood disorders; about 9% reported an episode of major depression in the previous year.

In men, it’s the job category most likely to be associated with an episode of major depression (nearly 7% in full-time workers).

“One thing seen a lot in entertainers and artists is bipolar illness. There could be undiagnosed or untreated mood disorders in people who are artistic…. Depression is not uncommon to those who are drawn to work in the arts, and then the lifestyle contributes to it.”

4. Healthcare Workers
This includes doctors, nurses, therapists, and other professions that attract people who might end up giving a lot without saving a little for themselves. Health-care workers can have long, irregular hours and days in which other people’s lives are literally in their hands.

3. Social Workers
Dealing with abused children or families on the brink of every imaginable crisis—combined with bureaucratic red tape—can make for a demanding, stressful job that’s often 24-7.

2. Food Service Staff
Wait staff often get low pay and can have exhausting jobs with numerous people telling them what to do each day.

While 10% of workers in general reported an episode of major depression in the past year, almost 15% of women in this field did so.

1. Nursing Home and Child Care Workers
Personal-care providers top the list, with nearly 11% of people in this field reporting a bout of major depression. (The rate is 13% in the unemployed; 7% in the general population.)

According to

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